Something you can do before booking your session


Booking Your Session

We all understand booking studio time can be costly. With most studios charging hourly, it can add up very quickly. 2 hours does sound like a lot of time, and I’m sure you’ll be able to record as many songs as you can within that session, but at that point, are you sacrificing quality over quantity? There’s no doubt music creation takes time, and forcing the product at the mercy of time can result in a very rushed sounding project. So how do you put our best effort forward without breaking the bank? Here are some tips to maybe help you budget for your next session and maximize your time while there.

Tips and Tricks

1. Set a goal of what you would like to accomplish within that session. For example, if you’re interested in booking a 4-hour session, then focus on getting one or two songs completed within that time. That will allow you the time need to polish your performance to get the best result.

2 Come to the studio prepared, or at least have a blueprint of what you want to do. Come in having a base idea of the direction you want to take for your project, like the tone you want and the sound you want it to have. Doing so will save time and get you and your engineer working on the same page.

3. A great way to afford some of these studio times is by splitting the cost with someone if they are working with you on the project. Many music artists collaborate, so equality dividing the total between members can help save some money.

Get it Right

There are ways to take advantage of your session, but the best philosophy is to be realistic in what you can and can not do. We all want to be “One Take Jake” but the reality is most of us are not. Take the time to focus on the critical aspect, every little part, and detail of the song. Work on trying to perfect that one song and make it better instead of rushing through it. The most important thing to remember is that your music lives on forever, so if it takes 6 or 7 hours to finish one track, that’s ok. The point is to get it right because it’s what will be out there in the world. Aim for quality, not quantity.